Johnny, Nick and Trent





Animal Abuse

Should hunting be allowed or not?!?!?!?

Is hunting justifiable, or is it inhumane to kill innocent creatures? Are animals put on the earth for beauty, or food?



Animal Testing-
Thesis: Although animal testing is looked at as being abusive, it is essential for ensuring that our everyday products are safe to be used.
Facts: Animal testing has been used to find the cures for many diseases; including Polio, Chicken Pox, Herpes, and many others as well. It is essencial for our everyday society and should not be considered an illegal act. There are many groups that are againist Animal Expirmentation, but i believe that our society would not be able to survive without this critical scientific expirment. HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) has been a hot topic on the minds of animal resurchers. Certain monkeys, called a Rhesus Macaque Monkey, can be infected with SIV (Simian Immunodeficiency Virus) which has many of the same trait as HIV, scientists have devolped a form of this disease that differs from HIV by only 1 gene. Since human DNA only differs from the DNA of chimpanzees by only 1%, this expirment can be very reliable.
Farm Animal Abuse-
Thesis:
Facts:
Introduction
The 1975 publication of Peter Singer's book Animal Liberation sparked the modern animal rights movement which seeks to provide animals with the same basic interests afforded to humans. Animal rights advocates believe that animals should not be viewed as property nor should they be used for food, clothing, experimentation or entertainment. In recent years, the number of animal rights activists has increased steadily. One of the largest and most powerful groups, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), was founded in 1980 with 100 members and now numbers over 750,000. Critics of the animal rights movement argue that animals are unable to enter into contracts or make moral choices, and therefore, cannot be afforded basic rights. In light of concerns voiced by animal rights advocates, the U.S. government has taken some steps to ensure animal welfare. The 1966 Animal Welfare Act (AWA) was signed into law to ensure the well-being of laboratory animals. The Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is responsible for enforcing provisions of the AWA, and the National Institutes of Health reviews and approves biomedical research protocols with respect to the use of animals. Other issues closely related to the animal rights movement include: commercial whaling, factory farms, hunting and zoos.
Perspectives
"Given what these animals have told us--in our own language--how can we keep parrots in tiny cages and deny them even their right to fly? How can anyone condemn animals to lives of deprivation and misery in circuses or roadside zoos? How can we continue to put our great ape cousins in laboratory cages and experiment on them?"--Kathy Guillermo, Director of Research for PETA
Alex "Animal studies allow us to test potential treatments without confounding factors, such as prior drug use and other experiences that complicate human studies. Even more important, they allow us to test possibly life-saving treatments before they are considered safe to test in humans. Our animal studies address the effects of chronic drug use on brain functions, such as decision-making and self-control, that are impaired in human addicts. We are also testing potential treatments, and all of our studies comply with federal laws designed to ensure humane care."--Edythe London, UCLA Professor
As reported last week, the Conklin Dairy Farm in Union County, Ohio, came under fire after disturbing video footage was released to the public by Mercy for Animals. The footage showed cows and calves being brutally beaten, punched, stabbed, and abused by farm workers. The video led to the arrest of Billy Joe Gregg (who wanted to become a police officer!!!), the most frequent perpetrator in the video. He now faces 12 counts of animal abuse.
The response to this story is overwhelming, and it has charged up animal activists all over the nation, prompting calls to action all over the Internet. One such call alarmed police enough that they posted 150 officers around the dairy Monday, May 31st, after one activist tried to incite an organized riot and seeming demolition of the farm.
The person responsible for this call to action is activist, Gary Yourofsky, who wrote, in his blog, 30 Banana's a Day, "I am asking everyone who cares about justice and injustice to bring bolt cutters, bats, crowbars, pitchforks, hammers and wrenches to help destroy every piece of equipment the farm has, and tear down the sheds."
You can't fault the man for caring this much, but such actions would undermine what legally needs to be done in order to increase the weak animal cruelty laws in Ohio. The good people at Farm Sanctuary have already offered a home to every abused cow and calf found on the premises, and even the ones sold off by owner, Gary Conklin.
Conklin released a statement saying " "Our family takes the care of our cows and calves very seriously. The video shows animal care that is clearly inconsistent with the high standards we set for our farm and its workers, and we find the specific mistreatment shown on the video to be reprehensible and unacceptable." The problem with this statement is that Conklin, himself, is shown in the disturbing video repeatedly kicking a cow!
It is not enough to charge Billy Joe Gregg. Gary Conklin should have his license revoked and never be allowed to own farm animals again in light of his own abuse of animals, and lack of responsible supervision over the animals in his care.
A group called Change is leading the fight to have Conklin Dairy Farm shut down. If you care for animals, and wish to help end animal cruelty, visit this site and sign the petition.
Inhumane treatment of animals must stop! Animal cruelty laws must be consistent in every state. In addition, the penalties should be federal crimes rather than simply misdemeanors. Deliberately causing harm to any animal is no different than child abuse. Both are to small, and too weak to defend themselves.
Help be a voice for those who cannot speak for themselves. Share this article with friends, and sign the petition to bring the abuse at Conklin Dairy Farm to an end.
When chicks crawl out of their eggs in the hatchery, they are moved to a laying or fattening farm, depending on their race and sex. The young cocks are 'worthless' and are killed with carbon dioxide in a plastic bag or they are shredded. The chicks that go to the battery will live in a shed with long rows of cages made of wire mesh, with three or more stories on top of each other. The animals live in small cages, 4 chickens are crammed together; the cages have a dimension of 45x50cm (like a large computer monitor). They lay their eggs on the wire mesh and cannot spread their wings. As a result of this distressing situation they peck at each other. That's why their beaks are burnt (without anaesthesia). The chickens don't have a roost to sleep on and a disrupted day/night rhythm is forced on them, to have them lay as many eggs as possible.
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See full size image

10 Billion, 27 Million, and 19,000:
Every year, 10 billion domesticated land animals are slaughtered for food in the United States — 27 million each day and 19,000 every minute.
50 Billion and 1,680:
Worldwide, the yearly slaughter count is more than 50 billion. Every second, 1,680 animals are killed for food. Most farmed animals are killed when they are barely adolescents or even younger, such as the "broiler" chickens raised for meat who are slaughtered at only 6–7 weeks old.
250 Million Chicks :
The U.S. egg industry suffocates, gases, or grinds up alive 250 million male chicks each year; they are not profitable because they will never produce eggs and are not bred to grow at an unnatural speed like broiler chickens.
5.5 Million Calves:
The 4.5 million calves in Europe and 1 million calves in the United States annually destined to become veal are forcibly pulled away from their mothers — dairy cows — within hours, or at most 1–2 days, of birth. The milk produced naturally by the mother's body for her calf, who normally would suckle for 6 to 12 months, is to be taken for sale to humans, so the calf is fed nutritionally deficient formula. His movement is severely restricted, to give his flesh the texture and color desired by human consumers.
90 Percent of Soybeans and 80 Percent of Corn:
More than 90 percent of soybean meal grown in the United States is used to feed animals being raised for human food; these animals also consume 80 percent of corn grown in the United States.
Animal Agriculture and Environment
70 Percent of Land:
In the Amazon, 70 percent of once-forested land is now used for grazing cattle.
18 Percent of Greenhouse Gas Emissions:
Animal agriculture is responsible for 18 percent of greenhouse gas emissions — more than all the planes, trains, ships, and automobiles in the world combined. Animal agriculture is responsible for an astonishing 65 percent of nitrous oxide emissions (a gas with a global warming potential [GWP] 296 times that of CO2), 37 percent of methane (GWP 23 times that of CO2), and 9 percent of CO2.
37 Percent of Pesticides and 50 Percent of Antibiotics:
Animal agriculture uses 37 percent of all pesticides and 50 percent of antibiotics and contributes enormously to water pollution, endangering human and nonhuman animal health and life.

When chicks crawl out of their eggs in the hatchery, they are moved to a laying or fattening farm, depending on their race and sex. The young cocks are 'worthless' and are killed with carbon dioxide in a plastic bag or they are shredded. The chicks that go to the battery will live in a shed with long rows of cages made of wire mesh, with three or more stories on top of each other. The animals live in small cages, 4 chickens are crammed together; the cages have a dimension of 45x50cm (like a large computer monitor). They lay their eggs on the wire mesh and cannot spread their wings. As a result of this distressing situation they peck at each other. That's why their beaks are burnt (without anaesthesia). The chickens don't have a roost to sleep on and a disrupted day/night rhythm is forced on them, to have them lay as many eggs as possible.

The 1975 publication of Peter Singer's book Animal Liberation sparked the modern animal rights movement which seeks to provide animals with the same basic interests afforded to humans. Animal rights advocates believe that animals should not be viewed as property nor should they be used for food, clothing, experimentation or entertainment. In recent years, the number of animal rights activists has increased steadily. One of the largest and most powerful groups, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), was founded in 1980 with 100 members and now numbers over 750,000. Critics of the animal rights movement argue that animals are unable to enter into contracts or make moral choices, and therefore, cannot be afforded basic rights. In light of concerns voiced by animal rights advocates, the U.S. government has taken some steps to ensure animal welfare. The 1966 Animal Welfare Act (AWA) was signed into law to ensure the well-being of laboratory animals. The Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is responsible for enforcing provisions of the AWA, and the National Institutes of Health reviews and approves biomedical research protocols with respect to the use of animals. Other issues closely related to the animal rights movement include: commercial whaling, factory farms, hunting and zoos.